Cool Stuff

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Shell Boxes


(This section will see a MAJOR UPDATING very soon; for now, please see Shell Boxes For Sale).

 

Since a young child, I've collected paper shotgun shells, their boxes, and the old wooden crates they used to come in.  It's a fascinating hobby which combines my love for the history of a bygone erea, and the allure of the forests, fields and streams.  Any technical information in the captions probably came from 'The Shotshell in the United States' by Richard J. Iverson.  And yes, I am still interested in adding to my collection by buying or trading. 

More to come when I have time...

Skull Art


I've not had time to do much of this, but here are some examples of various skulls I've added a little artistic touch to.  It's my opinion that sometimes "less is more" in this venture.  My best efforts have involved black, white, and maybe one additional color.

Wooden Ammo Boxes...


(This section needs a major update as my collection has blown up the past five years; please check back later when I've had a chance to update). 

 

I've always been interested in the history of hunting and one of the hobbies I've pursued since I was a kid was collecting wooden ammo boxes.  With 254 different boxes in my collection, it will take a while to document them here, but here's a start.  As with the paper boxes, I've taken much of my historical information from 'The Shotshell in the United States' by Richard J. Iverson (1988), as well as well as  'Shotgun Shells' by Frank H. Stewart (1969).  Note:   I am still interested in these boxes and willing to buy or trade.

Random Oddities...


Years of being a pack rat pay off when it comes to story time with all kinds of little oddities picked up over the years.  Just beginning on this one, but here's a start.

© 2013 Bryce Lambley All Rights Reserved

brycelambley.com

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The rest of the story

"Tree Blaze from the first Land Survey in the Black Hills of South Dakota in 1876. Found by L.W. Sexton in 1931." You want to hazard a guess who was doing a "land survey" in the Black Hills in 1876? General George Armstrong Custer. Yeah, that guy.